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Ethics in the use of autonomous robot systems

Who bears the responsibility for what autonomous systems do and decide? Daniel Trusilo explores the use of autonomous robotic systems in the conflict environment. In a video interview, he talks about why we need to think about ethics in the use of autonomous robot systems in security applications.

01.02.2022 | Pascal Vörös, Swiss Drone and Robotics Centre DDPS, armasuisse Science and Technology

Pascal Vörös, on the left in the picture, and Daniel Trusilo, on the right in the picture, sit opposite each other on a staircase in the army village of Wangen an der Aare.
Daniel Trusilo (right), in an interview here with Pascal Vörös (left), served as an officer in the US Army for seven years. He is currently a doctoral student at the University of St. Gallen.

For the Swiss Drone and Robotics Centre of the DDPS (SDRC DDPS), it is important to soundly address the ethical risks of autonomous systems. In his doctorate at the University of St. Gallen, Daniel Trusilo is developing a viable ethics evaluation scheme for the SDRC DDPS under the direction of Prof. Dr. Thomas Burri. 

Mr. Trusilo, what are the advantages of autonomous robot systems for security tasks?

What would it be important to consider regarding their use?

Could there be a possible use for autonomous systems in humanitarian crises?

Why is ethics important with these systems?

What are you researching for the Drone and Robotics Centre of the DDPS?

What are the most important experiences of your research to date?

Where are we today in the area of autonomous weapons systems and what does this mean from an ethical perspective?

From your point of view, what is the most important thing in the development of autonomous robotic systems?

Brief profile Daniel Trusilo

Daniel Trusilo is a doctoral student at the University of St. Gallen. He is exploring the use of autonomous robotic systems in the conflict environment. Daniel Trusilo was previously the Humanitarian Assistance Advisor at the U.S. Agency for International Development and worked as part of a Fulbright Fellowship in Nepal in civil-military affairs for disaster preparedness and management. Daniel also served for seven years as an officer in the US army, where he held a variety of different positions. He holds a Bachelor’s degree in International Relations from the U.S. Military Academy at West Point as well as a Master’s degree in International Relations, Law and Diplomacy from the University of St. Gallen and from the Fletcher School, Tufts University, Boston.

armafolio article: «Perfect match!» (in German)

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